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Food and Drink in Amsterdam

From mini pancakes to croquettes from a vending machine, Amsterdam offers the hungry traveller plenty of unique culinary experiences. Don't go home without trying at least one of these traditional Dutch foods. Pannenkoekenhuis Upstairs Everything about this tiny, four-table café is quintessential Amsterdam: It's set in a 16th-century house, you can only access the dining room via a narrow staircase, there are quirky teapots hanging from the ceiling, and the menu consists of pancakes, only pancakes. That is, the Dutch variety served with savory, and sometimes sweet, toppings. For a traditional order, try the sweet-and-savory combination of bacon, cheese, and apple.  Bar Fisk With rattan chairs and fishing poles hanging from the wall, Bar Fish strives to recreate the feeling of sitting on a seaside patio, even during the dead of winter in Amsterdam. A youthful and enthusiastic crowd often takes advantage of Bar Fisk's late hours. The menu consists of a selection of shareable plates linked to the flavors of Tel Aviv. Conservatorium Brasserie & Lounge The Conservatorium Hotel's brasserie may spill into the lobby, but floor-to-ceiling windows and glass ceiling undoubtedly make it one of the most jaw-droppingly gorgeous restaurants in Amsterdam. Chef Schilo van Coevorden's plates have clear Dutch influence but still maintain a sense of delicacy. (Think veal tartare with cucumber, cream of mackerel, and seaweed.)   Librije's Zusje Librije's Zusje is like a posh cocoon—gray walls, plush chairs, white table clothes—hidden away inside the Waldorf Astoria and overlooking a garden. The intimacy is a fitting ambiance for the sister restaurant to the renowned, three-Michelin-starred De Librije ("zusje" literally means sister in Dutch), in the northeastern city of Zwolle.  Yamazato You probably didn't travel all the way to Amsterdam to eat Japanese food, but you might want to rethink that. Yamazato, which excels in kaiseki cuisine, was the first traditional Japanese restaurant in Europe to be awarded a Michelin star in 2002. The decor is decidedly Japanese and the dining room even overlooks a garden. Kaiseki menus are the main event. Expect a flurry of delicate creations. Foodhallen The Foodhallen stands out among other indoor food markets thanks to its top-notch offerings, serving everything from reimagined Dutch classics to Vietnamese and Mexican. Housed inside a former tram depot, Foodhallen is buzzing at all hours of the day. Aggressively guard your table if you manage to get one at all. Gin & Tonic Bar makes, you guessed it, gin and tonics with a range of different ingredients (try the one with jenever for something a bit different). Beerbar, meanwhile, pours more than 60 different local and international beers, including two brewed specifically for Foodhallen.

From mini pancakes to croquettes from a vending machine, Amsterdam offers the hungry traveller plenty of unique culinary experiences. Don't go home without trying at least one of these traditional Dutch foods.

Pannenkoekenhuis Upstairs

Everything about this tiny, four-table café is quintessential Amsterdam: It's set in a 16th-century house, you can only access the dining room via a narrow staircase, there are quirky teapots hanging from the ceiling, and the menu consists of pancakes, only pancakes. That is, the Dutch variety served with savory, and sometimes sweet, toppings. For a traditional order, try the sweet-and-savory combination of bacon, cheese, and apple. 

Bar Fisk

With rattan chairs and fishing poles hanging from the wall, Bar Fish strives to recreate the feeling of sitting on a seaside patio, even during the dead of winter in Amsterdam. A youthful and enthusiastic crowd often takes advantage of Bar Fisk's late hours. The menu consists of a selection of shareable plates linked to the flavors of Tel Aviv.

Conservatorium Brasserie & Lounge

The Conservatorium Hotel's brasserie may spill into the lobby, but floor-to-ceiling windows and glass ceiling undoubtedly make it one of the most jaw-droppingly gorgeous restaurants in Amsterdam. Chef Schilo van Coevorden's plates have clear Dutch influence but still maintain a sense of delicacy. (Think veal tartare with cucumber, cream of mackerel, and seaweed.)
 

Librije's Zusje

Librije's Zusje is like a posh cocoon—gray walls, plush chairs, white table clothes—hidden away inside the Waldorf Astoria and overlooking a garden. The intimacy is a fitting ambiance for the sister restaurant to the renowned, three-Michelin-starred De Librije ("zusje" literally means sister in Dutch), in the northeastern city of Zwolle. 

Yamazato

You probably didn't travel all the way to Amsterdam to eat Japanese food, but you might want to rethink that. Yamazato, which excels in kaiseki cuisine, was the first traditional Japanese restaurant in Europe to be awarded a Michelin star in 2002. The decor is decidedly Japanese and the dining room even overlooks a garden. Kaiseki menus are the main event. Expect a flurry of delicate creations.

Foodhallen

The Foodhallen stands out among other indoor food markets thanks to its top-notch offerings, serving everything from reimagined Dutch classics to Vietnamese and Mexican. Housed inside a former tram depot, Foodhallen is buzzing at all hours of the day. Aggressively guard your table if you manage to get one at all. Gin & Tonic Bar makes, you guessed it, gin and tonics with a range of different ingredients (try the one with jenever for something a bit different). Beerbar, meanwhile, pours more than 60 different local and international beers, including two brewed specifically for Foodhallen.