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Things to do in Hong Kong

There’s no question you’re in a dazzling city full of opportunity and excitement when you look out across the great harbour with its flurry of activity and take in the full scope of one of the most impressive skylines in the world. Hong Kong is a city full of possibility and when it comes to holidaying in this thriving hub, the list of things to see and do is endless. Here's a glimpse at just some of the top attractions in this glamorous metropolis. Victoria Peak ‘The Peak’ as it is commonly known as, is one of Hong Kong’s most popular attractions. Offering breathtaking views of the city and harbour below, this magnificent lookout is reached by tram. The historic carriage climbs assuredly up the steep mountain embankment as riders revel in the mountain’s lush tropical beauty and impressive cliff side homes; all the while fleeting glimpses of the great city below can be scene through the tree tops. Reaching the summit, visitors are treated to gorgeous panoramic views of the impressive skyline below. The Peak also features parklands, restaurants and local artists selling their works.  Po Lin Monastery Offering a fascinating cultural perspective, Po Lin Monastery is located on a high peak overlooking Lantau Island. The monastery features lovely temples and shrines as well as the enormous Tian Tan Buddha statue. At 34 metres tall, this impressive bronze statue of a seated Buddha is one of the largest examples of its kind in the world.  The statue sits on a mountain top pedestal overlooking the peaceful monastery and is visible for miles away. After walking the idyllic grounds make your way to the small restaurant within the monastery grounds and enjoy some local vegetarian dishes, rice and a cup of tea.  For a wonderful birds-eye-view of the island take the Ngong Ping 360 cable car up to the monastery – an efficient, enjoyable way to reach Po Lin.  Flagstaff House Hong Kong’s oldest remaining building from the British colonial period, Flagstaff House is the former residence of the head of British forces in Hong Kong. This lovely home features stately columns and charming verandas and is today, quite appropriately the site of The Museum of Tea Ware. Built in the early 1840’s, the Greek Revival manor was given to the Hong Kong Government in 1978 and declared an historic monument in 1989.     Hong Kong Museum of History This spacious and comprehensive museum features engaging displays, exhibits and artefacts, all brought together in rich, compelling detail for the purpose of preserving Hong Kong’s past. The museum holds thousands of engrossing exhibits within 8 separate galleries and features over 50 multi-media programs, all highlighting aspects of Hong Kong’s cultural history and its natural and environmental past. Just some of the eight fascinating museum galleries include Prehistoric Hong Kong, Birth and Early Growth of the City, The Japanese Occupation and Modern Metropolis and the Return to China. Tsim Tsa Shui Waterfront For those looking to stretch their legs while on shore, head straight for the Tsim Tsa Shui Waterfront for ample strolling time in a prime position. A wonderful promenade stretches from the Star Ferry terminal along the waters of Victoria Harbour and all the way to Hung Hom train station. The highlight along the route is easily the Avenue of Stars – Hong Kong’s version of the Hollywood Walk of Fame, paying tribute to the likes of Bruce Lee and Jacky Chan in the form of commemorative plaques, celebrity handprints, movie memorabilia and descriptive milestones. Lantau Island For a unique Hong Kong experience far from the city hustle, venture into the lush mountain scenery of Lantau Island in search of the Big Buddha – a 34-metre high giant bronze Buddha that draws pilgrims from all over Asia. Next door, the Po Lin Monastery is also fascinating, where you can also sit down to a vegetarian lunch. A magical part of the experience however is getting there with a ride on the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car. It is the longest bi-cable ropeway in Asia and for the entire 25 minute ride offers wonderful views of the island’s greenery far from the towering skyscrapers of downtown Hong Kong. 

There’s no question you’re in a dazzling city full of opportunity and excitement when you look out across the great harbour with its flurry of activity and take in the full scope of one of the most impressive skylines in the world. Hong Kong is a city full of possibility and when it comes to holidaying in this thriving hub, the list of things to see and do is endless. Here's a glimpse at just some of the top attractions in this glamorous metropolis.

Victoria Peak

‘The Peak’ as it is commonly known as, is one of Hong Kong’s most popular attractions. Offering breathtaking views of the city and harbour below, this magnificent lookout is reached by tram. The historic carriage climbs assuredly up the steep mountain embankment as riders revel in the mountain’s lush tropical beauty and impressive cliff side homes; all the while fleeting glimpses of the great city below can be scene through the tree tops. Reaching the summit, visitors are treated to gorgeous panoramic views of the impressive skyline below. The Peak also features parklands, restaurants and local artists selling their works. 

Po Lin Monastery

Offering a fascinating cultural perspective, Po Lin Monastery is located on a high peak overlooking Lantau Island. The monastery features lovely temples and shrines as well as the enormous Tian Tan Buddha statue. At 34 metres tall, this impressive bronze statue of a seated Buddha is one of the largest examples of its kind in the world.  The statue sits on a mountain top pedestal overlooking the peaceful monastery and is visible for miles away. After walking the idyllic grounds make your way to the small restaurant within the monastery grounds and enjoy some local vegetarian dishes, rice and a cup of tea.  For a wonderful birds-eye-view of the island take the Ngong Ping 360 cable car up to the monastery – an efficient, enjoyable way to reach Po Lin. 

Flagstaff House

Hong Kong’s oldest remaining building from the British colonial period, Flagstaff House is the former residence of the head of British forces in Hong Kong. This lovely home features stately columns and charming verandas and is today, quite appropriately the site of The Museum of Tea Ware. Built in the early 1840’s, the Greek Revival manor was given to the Hong Kong Government in 1978 and declared an historic monument in 1989.    

Hong Kong Museum of History

This spacious and comprehensive museum features engaging displays, exhibits and artefacts, all brought together in rich, compelling detail for the purpose of preserving Hong Kong’s past. The museum holds thousands of engrossing exhibits within 8 separate galleries and features over 50 multi-media programs, all highlighting aspects of Hong Kong’s cultural history and its natural and environmental past. Just some of the eight fascinating museum galleries include Prehistoric Hong Kong, Birth and Early Growth of the City, The Japanese Occupation and Modern Metropolis and the Return to China.

Tsim Tsa Shui Waterfront

For those looking to stretch their legs while on shore, head straight for the Tsim Tsa Shui Waterfront for ample strolling time in a prime position. A wonderful promenade stretches from the Star Ferry terminal along the waters of Victoria Harbour and all the way to Hung Hom train station. The highlight along the route is easily the Avenue of Stars – Hong Kong’s version of the Hollywood Walk of Fame, paying tribute to the likes of Bruce Lee and Jacky Chan in the form of commemorative plaques, celebrity handprints, movie memorabilia and descriptive milestones.

Lantau Island

For a unique Hong Kong experience far from the city hustle, venture into the lush mountain scenery of Lantau Island in search of the Big Buddha – a 34-metre high giant bronze Buddha that draws pilgrims from all over Asia. Next door, the Po Lin Monastery is also fascinating, where you can also sit down to a vegetarian lunch. A magical part of the experience however is getting there with a ride on the Ngong Ping 360 Cable Car. It is the longest bi-cable ropeway in Asia and for the entire 25 minute ride offers wonderful views of the island’s greenery far from the towering skyscrapers of downtown Hong Kong. 

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